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Jack Osbourne during his Q&A

Jack’s FAQs

Q:

How has your diagnosis with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) changed you/your life?

A:

I definitely appreciate things more, and I'm learning that it's okay to not be going full throttle all the time. But I'm not going to build my life around my disease. I still go on hikes and ride my motorcycle because I love being active.

Q:

How are you feeling?

A:

I'm feeling really good, but I know this can become a progressive disease, so I'm not taking anything for granted.

Q:

What are you doing to stay healthy?

A:

I worked with my doctor to find a treatment that works for me, and I changed my lifestyle, keeping stress to a minimum and making time to exercise regularly. I also try to eat healthy foods like lean protein and lots of vegetables, avoiding the junk food I used to eat.

Q:

How has your wife Lisa helped you manage your RRMS?

A:

Lisa has been great — a real trooper. She learned everything she could about the disease. In fact, she knows as much about MS as I do! She's really good at encouraging me to take breaks and say no to professional requests when I need to slow down. She also keeps me focused and makes sure I get enough rest and exercise. I definitely wouldn't be doing as well as I am without her.

Q:

How have your parents reacted to your diagnosis?

A:

They've been really supportive and have learned a lot about MS. Just as she did when she was diagnosed with colon cancer, my mother did a lot of reading and research to get up to speed on the disease. But, like any parents, they worry a lot, so I try to assure them that I'm doing OK.

Q:

What were your initial RRMS symptoms?

A:

I was on location shooting Haunted Highway, and there was this scene where I had to scuba dive into a lake at night. I came up with the worst headache ever, and the next morning my eyesight was blurry. My vision started getting progressively worse, so my doctor referred me to a neurologist, and he diagnosed me with RRMS.

Q:

How did you feel when you were first diagnosed?

A:

I was shocked by my diagnosis. It was honestly the last thing I expected to hear. And then I thought, "Well, that's it, game over," because I assumed that everyone with MS has a progressive decline and winds up in a wheelchair. It was also frustrating that I didn't know anyone my age with MS. I incorrectly assumed that only older women get it. I realized there's a huge need to get more info out there about MS, and that's why I decided to work with Teva Neuroscience on You Don't Know Jack About MS®.

Q:

What are the biggest misperceptions about MS?

A:

That everyone who gets it becomes horribly incapacitated and that younger people don't get it. One thing we focus on in the You Don't Know Jack About MS® webisodes is that MS is like a fingerprint; everyone's experience is unique. Just because a treatment or approach works for one person doesn't mean it will work for another. That's why I encourage everyone with MS to work with their doctor to find a treatment plan that's right for them and to be proactive like I was in getting the support and information they need.

Q:

What would you say to other people with MS and their care partners?

A:

Be proactive and learn as much as you can about the disease and work with your doctor to find a treatment plan that works for you. And, know that you're not alone. There are lots of resources out there to help you find the support you need. Most importantly, MS doesn't mean the end of life as you know it. You can still reach your goals and enjoy the things you did before you were diagnosed, but understand it's also important to take breaks and pace yourself. My message is that I don't live with RRMS; it lives with me.

Q:

Why did you decide to go public with your RRMS diagnosis?

A:

I struggled at first as to whether I should tell people, but ultimately decided it was the right thing to do. I wanted to let people know that, while RRMS is a part of my life, it's not controlling my life. I also want to change the way people think about MS. There are so many misperceptions about the disease, and I definitely think it's time to set the record straight.